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European cars registered when entering the UK?


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#1 Alex

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 11:01 PM

When entering the UK via ferry or Eurotunnel (or leaving), are (tourist) cars with European license plates being registered?


Can the UK police find out how long a car with European license plates has been in the country?



#2 exmetskipper

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 08:51 AM

All will have been checked via ANPR so the number ( whether UK or European )  will show arrival and departure via a PNC check on checks made on that number over a specified time ... other than that, no formal regsitration is made !!!

#3 999tommo

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 11:24 PM

If a persons brings a foreign registered car into the UK and they are a visitor (i.e. Tourist) they can drive the vehicle for up to 185 days in any 12 month period (basically six months).  After that time they must register the vehicle with the Secretary of State (DVLA) and will then have to comply with MOT testing if appropriate and Road Tax. 
 

If someone brings the foreign registered vehicle into the UK and they are a resident, it must be registered immediately, so the journey into the country to home address should be the only journey the vehicle makes.

 

It is up to the person with the vehicle to prove when they brought it into the country (by producing receipts for Ferry etc.).

 

A scam operated in Scotland and I'm sure we are not unique, is for Polish residents in the UK to go on holiday to Poland and buy a car for sixpence, insure it for £45 which allows anyone to drive it (in Poland the car is insured not the driver) then drive it to the UK and drive for as long as they can on their £45 insurance policy in the UK, with no MOT and no Tax.

 

Police in general in the UK don't stop foreign registered cars as they think they will be difficult to deal with.  It's easy and we have had quite a lot of success with our stops.


#4 Traffic Rat

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 04:27 PM

Quote

If a persons brings a foreign registered car into the UK and they are a visitor (i.e. Tourist) they can drive the vehicle for up to 185 days in any 12 month period (basically six months).  After that time they must register the vehicle with the Secretary of State (DVLA) and will then have to comply with MOT testing if appropriate and Road Tax. 
 

If someone brings the foreign registered vehicle into the UK and they are a resident, it must be registered immediately, so the journey into the country to home address should be the only journey the vehicle makes.

 

It is up to the person with the vehicle to prove when they brought it into the country (by producing receipts for Ferry etc.).

 

A scam operated in Scotland and I'm sure we are not unique, is for Polish residents in the UK to go on holiday to Poland and buy a car for sixpence, insure it for £45 which allows anyone to drive it (in Poland the car is insured not the driver) then drive it to the UK and drive for as long as they can on their £45 insurance policy in the UK, with no MOT and no Tax.

 

Police in general in the UK don't stop foreign registered cars as they think they will be difficult to deal with.  It's easy and we have had quite a lot of success with our stops.

 

Tommo,  Can't get my hands on the right bit, but there has been recent clarification on this via the like of the MIB and Other insurance companies etc ... Under Sec 145, if the person is Resident in the Uk, the foreign vehicle MUst have UK issued insurance, the Polish Policy is Null and void in UK once they settle here - Snatch the car that's what i say.

 

I'll hunt the legislation / Info I have at work and post it in 2 days once I've been back to work 
Traffic Rat2007-03-21 18:53:51
North West Motorway Police Group

Cheshire, Merseyside, GMP & Lancashire Police Working on over 30% of the Nations Motorways

#5 carrotchomper

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 04:49 PM

We had a car off a Polish bloke last night. No insurance, tax, anything... Priceless!
More ramblings from the pen of...

#6 999tommo

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 09:59 AM

Quote

 

Tommo,  Can't get my hands on the right bit, but there has been recent clarification on this via the like of the MIB and Other insurance companies etc ... Under Sec 165, if the person is Resident in the Uk, the foreign vehicle MUst have UK issued insurance, the Polish Policy is Null and void in UK once they settle here - Snatch the car that's what i say.

 

I'll hunt the legislation / Info I have at work and post it in 2 days once I've been back to work 

 

We had a conversation with a Polish Insurance Company.  Like many UK companies, they say that a standard clause in Polish insurance is that foreign use is restricted to 90 days in any twelve months.

 

We have also spoken to DVLA about foreign vehicles being registered in the UK and they say if a foreign vehicle is registered in the UK, a UK policy of insurance MUST be produced.

 

THe problem is getting something in writing that would satisfy the courts.  In Scotland the Procurator Fiscal (Crown Prosecutor in England/Wales) tends to shy away from getting involved in anything which is not black and white.

 

We just need to bite the bullet, seize the cars and compile a well constructed report.  If a report is well constucted, it usually gets full backing from the courts.


#7 Traffic Rat

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 06:36 PM


Extract from Recent release from DfT - Ch Supt Jerry MOORE, Road User Safety Division, Zone 2/11 Room A, Great Minster House, 76 Marsham Street


UK Registered Vehicle Insured in another EU State Has

NO INSURANCE

I have been alerted to an issue that appears to be more and more commonplace throughout the country. EU citizens, such as Polish residents in the UK, are purchasing a UK registered car and then insuring that car for use on our roads but through an insurance company in their home country (Poland in this case).


This is obviously cheaper and somewhat confusing to our officers as the policy is firstly in Polish and secondly it is not known if it actually covers the person or not. The Road Traffic Act 1988 sets out the requirements. S143 states that a person must not use a motor vehicle unless they have a policy that meets the requirements of the Act.


S145 includes in the requirement that the policy must be issued by an authorised insurer. It further clarifies this in SS(5) by defining the authorised insurer as one who carries on business under the Insurance Companies Act 1982 and is a member of the Motor Insurance Bureau.


Enquiries with the section in DfT dealing with Insurance and this part of the Road Traffic Act highlights how the requirement in S145 (5) refers only to UK companies. No other company, outside the UK, can be registered under the Insurance Companies Act or with the Motor Insurers Bureau.


So what about non-UK vehicles temporarily brought into the UK. Well as you expected that is covered too. The Motor Vehicles (International Motor Insurance Card) Regulations 1971 (SI1971 /792) permit the use of a vehicle named on an insurance card issued to a visitor to have the effect as if it were insured here in the UK.


So no UK insurance for a UK registered vehicle = No Insurance




S143 Road Traffic Act 1988


Users of motor vehicles to be insured or secured against third-party risks


(1) Subject to the provisions of this


Part of this Act—

(a) a person must not use a motor vehicle on a road [or other public place] unless there is in force in relation to the use of the vehicle by that person such a policy of insurance or such a security in respect of third party risks as complies with the requirements of this Part of this Act,


S145 Road Traffic Act 1988


Requirements in respect of policies of insurance


(1) In order to comply with the requirements of this Part of this Act, a policy of insurance must satisfy the following conditions.


(2) The policy must be issued by an authorised insurer………..




S145 Road Traffic Act 1988


(5) In this Part of this Act “authorised insurer” means a person or body of persons carrying on insurance business within Group 2 in Part II of Schedule 2 to the Insurance Companies Act 1982 and being a member of the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (a company limited by guarantee and incorporated under the Companies Act 1929 on 14th June 1946).

Traffic Rat2007-03-21 18:53:12
North West Motorway Police Group

Cheshire, Merseyside, GMP & Lancashire Police Working on over 30% of the Nations Motorways

#8 hip_spasm

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 11:05 PM

So basically, as regards to vehicles themselves if I get them to cough the motor has been here for longer than 6 months, then it needs to be registered, and therefore Tax'd and Mot'd and therefore insured by a UK company?  Either a cough or something fancy like checking ANPR at ferry terminals or ticket receipts etc.
 

As for drivers, EU can drive here forever on their own countries license (or swap over if they want) and Non-EU drivers can drive for 12 months before they have to get a UK license.

 

Have I got this right?

 

Am I right?


#9 999tommo

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 07:03 PM

hip spasm....


Yes, all EC or EEA driver can drive in the UK for 3 years or until their 70th birthday, whichever is the longer (providing their licence ramains valid).  Non EC/EEA members can drive here for 12 months from the date they first became resident.  If they are a visitor (tourist) they are not restricted to the twelve months, so they can come here for 6 months touring every year for years on their licence. 

 

A resident, and that includes a student, only has the twelve months, and despite leaving the UK to visit home and renew their international driving permit, it ceases to become valid twelve months after they became resident, even if the date on the permit appears valid.

 

For a Section 165a seizure, all you need is reasonable cause.  You have to be pretty sure you are doing the right thing, but if you get it wrong, the driver has the right to their seizure fees being returned through the appeal process.

 

You can get all the info on the licences from the DVLA webiste.  Here are two links, one for EC/EEA licence holders, which gives a list of all the countries covered, and one for every other country.

 


 



#10 catprincess

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 08:11 PM

Quote

So basically, as regards to vehicles themselves if I get them to cough the motor has been here for longer than 6 months, then it needs to be registered, and therefore Tax'd and Mot'd and therefore insured by a UK company?  Either a cough or something fancy like checking ANPR at ferry terminals or ticket receipts etc.
 

As for drivers, EU can drive here forever on their own countries license (or swap over if they want) and Non-EU drivers can drive for 12 months before they have to get a UK license.

 

Have I got this right?

 

Am I right?

 

following on from this quote..... if the vehicle has been here longer than  6 months and doesn't have the above, I'd take it it would be seized as having UK insurance would now apply and they wouldn't have any?

The big boy did it and ran away

#11 hip_spasm

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 06:37 PM

Quote

Quote

So basically, as regards to vehicles themselves if I get them to cough the motor has been here for longer than 6 months, then it needs to be registered, and therefore Tax'd and Mot'd and therefore insured by a UK company?  Either a cough or something fancy like checking ANPR at ferry terminals or ticket receipts etc.
 

As for drivers, EU can drive here forever on their own countries license (or swap over if they want) and Non-EU drivers can drive for 12 months before they have to get a UK license.

 

Have I got this right?

 

Am I right?

 

following on from this quote..... if the vehicle has been here longer than  6 months and doesn't have the above, I'd take it it would be seized as having UK insurance would now apply and they wouldn't have any?

 

I suppose so!


#12 richtrash

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 04:27 PM

So a Polish registered BMW with 05 on the plates that arrived in this country in Jan 2010 and the owner is resident here (I can tell you where they work) is definately not legal.  I have an ex PCO living over the road from me who now works in the Police control room and we were both wondering who you report it to. I reported the last car they had, supplied loads of details, no-one (Police/DVLA) is interested so I haven't bothered with this one yet but we are worried about how this car is insured and it definately hasn't been anywhere near an MOT Station for the last 15 months and thats not withstanding the road fund they are avoiding paying.


So if anyone can give me a contact number or email that I can report this to we would greatly appreciate it.

 
richtrash2011-03-16 16:28:09

#13 Penbwlch

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 04:40 PM

Hi Richtrash, you should, in theory be able to report it to any police officer but you may just get a better response from a member of the road policing unit for your area. Your friend in the control room should be able to tell you where your local one is.




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#14 richtrash

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 05:09 PM

Quote

Hi Richtrash, you should, in theory be able to report it to any police officer but you may just get a better response from a member of the road policing unit for your area. Your friend in the control room should be able to tell you where your local one is.















 

Thanks thats exactly what I needed, I'll give it a go, not bothered about tax avoidance but I am really concerned about what happens after they run into my car or god forbid run someone over.

 

I would have thought that the ANPR would have been set up to track these cars by now but its probably against their human rights, the person who owned the last car that was here for about 18 months worked in a Motorway Services with a big back of ANPR at the entrance so someone must have noticed the same car going in and out every day.

 

Just remembered there is a French registered Puegeot thats owned by a Polish family that visit the guy with the BMW regularly, thats been here over 2 years.

 

I guess the problem is that it costs to much to Police this sort of thing so it just gets brushed to one side but it isn't just about the money. 

 

 






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